Zanzibar Sock

A few days ago I finished knitting the first of two socks. I’m going to call it the Zanzibar sock after the name of the colourway, Zanzibar. To any that don’t know, colourway just seems to be knitter’s fancy schmancy way of saying the name of the yarn’s colour. I suppose thinking about it now, a lot of yarns aren’t just one colour….

I didn’t get this post up earlier with looking after a sick hubby and then me feeling crappy with a pinched nerve in my neck/shoulder. But here we are now.

I was nervous about doing a cuff-down sock because of the possibility of running out of yarn.  I cast on 68 stitches for what was calculated to be the size i needed, and I went with two inches of 1 by 1 ribbing on the cuff, followed by another half inch of stockinette before I started the heel flap. This is where you knit only half the stitches to go down the back of the heel. You then do a heel turn using short rows, but not the same wrap and turn ones I tried on my first sock. No holes here baby!

I think the sock looks a little weird here, as if it doesn’t sit flat, but note it hasn’t been washed and blocked yet.

There’s also that super unfortunate line across the ankle where the blue transitions to yellow. Booooo!

Zanzibar sock

After the heel turn came the part that I had read a lot of people hate – picking up and knitting the gusset stitches. I think it’s because they don’t know how many to pick up, or are afraid of holes that can appear. I think i did pretty good, I can’t see any holes, so yay! I did watch a few YouTube videos demonstrating the gusset pickups, that really helped.

I went from 34 stitches on the back up to 66, with 34 stitches on the front, or instep of the sock. It felt very awkward with that many stitches for a while, but they go down as you do the gusset decreases to reduce the number of stitches back down the original number. Once it was down to normal, it was just knitting in the round until I got to the toe, where it was the same type of decreases to cause the curved shape.

Here’s a close up of the toe decreases from the side of the sock. You can see the strange ridge all along the sock up the foot where these stitches were the middle of the round so they have a different tension, but when it is washed the stitches will adjust and the line should disappear.H

This picture below shows the sock as it was knitted, working the stitches up towards the toe. Decreases were done one before and one after the side stitches. These are basically knitting two stitches together in different ways to give the sloping effect.

It was scary and exciting to try it on at the end. Good news – It fits perfectly and even on my fat ankle foot, so I won’t need to adjust anything for sock number two.  I’ll definitely show you how they look on when I finish the second one.

I’ve already cast on and down a few rounds of the cuff for the second sock. I shall not succumb to “second sock syndrome” 🙂

You can also see my leftover yarn from ball one, compared to ball two. In all, I used 33 grams out of 55 grams (ball two is 50 grams). I guess i’ll have to make some baby socks to use up this yarn….?

This was a very enjoyable knit. Even though it’s plain, seeing the colours change frequently kept my interest as well as learning some new techniques. I learned to knit decreases, in the form of k2tog (knit two stitches together) and the ssk (slip slip knit) and also how to knit through the back loop, which causes a twist in the stitch. Picking up stitches no longer seems as scary either. Well that it’s for now. I’ll be back probably tomorrow with a Epic Pokemon Cross-stitch update!

Until next time, have fun!

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